Dirty-South Blues Harp forum: wail on! > New Lesson on Glissandos
New Lesson on Glissandos
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Moon Cat
772 posts
Feb 17, 2019
1:49 PM

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www.mooncat.org
nacoran
10061 posts
Feb 17, 2019
4:09 PM
Nice video. :)

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Nate
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First Post- May 8, 2009
Diggsblues
2207 posts
Feb 18, 2019
4:57 AM
I would call that ornamentation.
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dougharps
1909 posts
Feb 18, 2019
9:02 AM
Good video!

@Diggs
In my limited knowledge I would label some of the instances demonstrated as Glissando and some as ornaments.

An example that moves in discrete intervals (notes) from one pitch up or down to arrive at another would be Glissando.

One that dips to a note and returns to the same pitch would be an ornament.

One that moves pitch continuously from one note to another via bending would be portamento.

Glissando and portamento differ by the presence or absence of playing discrete intervals when traveling from one note to another. You articulate notes or you slide through pitches. For example, a trombone could play discrete notes while traversing the distance between the starting and ending pitches of ascending or descending pitch, or the trombone could slide pitches without articulation of notes.

An ornament touches and returns to a pitch.

The question remains as to how many half-steps are needed for an example to qualify as glissando as opposed to ornament. Is more than a half step enough, or more than a whole step? Moving from a C to a D is one step and I do not think it would be considered glissando. If you played C, C#, D would it be glissando? To me there needs to be a more clear definition as to how far the starting and ending notes must be apart to qualify for the label.

Just my opinion, limited in value as it may be...
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Doug S.
Diggsblues
2208 posts
Feb 18, 2019
10:37 AM
@doug a glissando or portamento can differ from instrument to instrument. a violin would slide and get every pitch, but an orchestral harp is limited by it's individual strings and how the pedals are set for the scale. When I write for orchestral harp I write it out rather than use the sign. Yes there are short slides in orchestral music on the violin.
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Moon Cat
773 posts
Feb 18, 2019
3:35 PM
"You can name it your mammy if you want to" - Rice Miller
www.mooncat.org
The Iceman
3775 posts
Feb 18, 2019
3:46 PM
"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet"
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The Iceman
dougharps
1913 posts
Feb 23, 2019
10:41 AM
Moon Cat, your videos are always very interesting and informative. Your summation about incorporating techniques and perhaps using them too much rings true with me.

Regarding the one hole shift glisses, do you ever use the jaw shift technique? When I began learning this in the mid '90s I had heard William Clarke, but also Brendan Power on his New Irish Harmonica CD doing this. Brendan used the jaw shift, so I learned it that way.
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Doug S.

EDIT: This technique is referred to on MBH here:

http://www.modernbluesharmonica.com/board/board_topic/5560960/4990008.htm

but I picked it up much earlier. (Maybe on Harp-L?)

Last Edited by dougharps on Feb 24, 2019 8:52 AM
erik
1 post
Feb 25, 2019
5:12 AM
Hey, Moon Cat, lookin' forward to seeing you in Michigan on March 3rd
Moon Cat
774 posts
Feb 27, 2019
4:35 AM
Dougharps: I think I do use a jaw thing a lot too...I know I do with the fast Pat Ramsey type stuff and Pat did too....

Erik: Thanks man be sure you introduce yourself as a member of this forum!!! Thank you for supporting live music my man!
J
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www.mooncat.org


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