Header Graphic
Dirty-South Blues Harp forum: wail on! > Wood Comb Warning
Wood Comb Warning
Login  |  Register
Page: 1

Hawmonica
9 posts
Jun 07, 2011
8:20 PM
I am not trying to disparage a competitor here, but I want to warn people that maybe bidding on these. They are cheaper than our combs but have serious issues:

eBay


Maple and Cherry Warp very easily, that is why we stopped using them. Rosewood highly poisonous, I know suzuki uses it, but still not worth the risk. Orange paduak smells like fish after it cuts. It take about a month for the smell to go away.

M
www.harmonicacombs.com

(edited by a Admin. to make link a link so that it doesn't make the screen to wide.)

Last Edited by on Jun 08, 2011 5:12 PM
nacoran
4182 posts
Jun 07, 2011
10:25 PM
Rosewood actually refers to a bunch of different woods, and all the sites I checked list it as a possible asthma risk or allergen, which might still be worth avoiding, but is not the same thing as poisonous and if orange paduak stops smelling after a month it sounds like you'd just need to air it out! As for warping issues, wouldn't sealing take care of that?

Instead of issuing warnings about particular competitors, maybe a better discussion topic might be the merits of different woods. We have a some great comb makers on here, and although I suspect some of their (and your information) might be trade secrets, a good healthy discussion might clear the air a bit.

I've wondered about different materials. GH and I were brainstorming in a thread once. We wondered about soapstone, but sadly there are articles that suggest since it's closely related to asbestos it wouldn't be good to rub on your face. I'd be interested (although it would surely be out of my price range at this point) in Alon. It's a clear ceramic aluminium alloy that is the next step in bullet resistant glass. It can stop a .50 Cal sniper round! Unfortunately, from my rough estimate of how much it would take to make a comb the materials alone, not counting in the cost of machining something that hard, would be about $200 per comb. Oh well. There was someone who made titanium combs (Mark Lavoie, but I can't find an active website for him.) And of course there is Dymondwood and Corian and brass.

----------
Nate
Facebook
Thread Organizer (A list of all sorts of useful threads)
Hawmonica
10 posts
Jun 08, 2011
12:51 AM
Good points. We worked extensivley with maple and cherry with a CNC machine, lacquering them sealing them..with wax, salad bowl finish etc. Most warped so we stopped carrying it. Maple would warp right off the CNC, we would take if off the machine and the tines were doing the way all learning towards the right. I have even noticed this with the seydel maple combs. I opened up an 1847 to replace the comb and some of the tines were warped. Too bad because maple is cheap and has good tone. Orange Paduak takes a long time to air out...longer than dymondwood. I cut and lacquered a set 2 months ago and I just got the fish smell to go away. Woods are weird and sometimes hard to work with! Otherwise the guys combs look good, but he is very new at this and has not gone through all of the challenges we have. He uses a CNC laser that I don't think is good for wood because it burns it. Laser is better for plastic, acrylic.

We used to sell at his price level but when we did the math, there was no profit.
stones
52 posts
Jun 08, 2011
7:07 AM
I just recieved two dymond wood combs from HETRICK last week, I gigged with them last weekend and they worked perfectly....but they did have a bit of an oder to them .. not bad but noticable. I've thought about acrylic or some thing transparent like that for a comb but really haven't seen any thing that made my liver quiver. what about some of these exotic woods like those 200 year old logs that they find in the swamps, do they warp as bad as some thing like maple or cherry ???? just curious.
florida-trader
1 post
Jun 08, 2011
10:31 AM
My name is Tom Halchak. I do business as florida-trader on eBay. I make and sell harmonica combs. Since my combs are the subject of this thread, perhaps it is time for me to chime in.

My esteemed colleague, Matthew Smart of The Hetrick Harmonica Company has raised a couple interesting and relevant questions.

“I am not trying to disparage a competitor here, but I want to warn people that maybe bidding on these. They are cheaper than our combs but have serious issues:”

My combs are indeed less expensive than most, but that is really not an issue that should be a cause for concern. Who among us would spend $2.00 for a product when we could get a product of equal value for $1.00?

“Maple and Cherry Warp very easily, that is why we stopped using them.”

Matthew is absolutely correct. Maple and Cherry do warp if you don’t seal them soon enough after cutting and exposing them to the elements – moisture in the air. I have discovered that it is best to cut the wood into combs very soon after milling the raw wood into planks and to then seal the combs as soon as they are cut. I have only had problems with warping on unsealed wood. Rest assured that if one of my combs comes out of production with a warped tine (and that is the part that warps – only the tines) it goes into the trash bin. If by chance I were to inadvertently ship a flawed comb, not to worry – I offer a 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. I will refund your money plus all shipping costs. Or I can just send you a new comb. Your choice.

“Rosewood highly poisonous, I know suzuki uses it, but still not worth the risk.”

Let’s talk about the issue of wood toxicity, because it is an important subject. After all, we are putting these instruments into our mouths for perhaps a couple of hours a day. It would be nice to know that we are not slowly killing ourselves by inhaling poison.

Toxicity was the very reason why I made my first combs out of Maple and Cherry. Maple has long been the standard wood for cutting boards. Most of us probably have one or more maple cutting boards in our kitchens and have been preparing our meals on them for years without incident. Cherry is another wood that has long been used to make food safe products such as salad bowls. Once again, most of us would be pretty comfortable with Cherry.

But let’s delve a little deeper into this subject. Anyone who is interested can do the same research that I have done and I would wager that they would reach the same conclusion that I have. The woodworking industry as a whole is rightfully concerned with wood toxicity. But not for the reasons you might first think. Most of the wood products that we use in our daily lives are finished products. What we don’t see and perhaps don’t realize is what goes into the making of these products – harmonica combs included. Woodworking requires a tremendous amount of sawing, planing, milling and sanding – all of which creates SAWDUST! I can tell you from first-hand experience that when I take a piece of raw lumber, rip it down to planks, plane it down to the proper thickness and sand it to a buttery smooth finish, it produces a lot of sawdust. And I’m just one guy making harmonica combs in my shop! Imagine the guys who manufacture wood products on a large scale in an industrial setting. In that environment, sawdust becomes a major health issue. When you read up on the dangers of wood toxicity, they primarily deal with the subjects of inhalation of the dust particles and prolonged exposure to the oils present in the wood. There is a plethora of information on the internet that any of us can read, but let me just direct you to one link:
http://www.woodworkerssource.com/wood_toxicity.php

Here is the past two paragraphs of that webpage in their entirety:

WHAT ABOUT TOXICITY OF WOOD IN MY FINISHED PROJECT?
Baby cribs and food utensils are popular projects, and ones that woodworkers are often curious about “safe” woods and finishes. The short: a sealed and finished wood poses no toxic risk.

What about the sealer or finish then? Solvent-based finishing products (lacquer, varnish, etc) are highly toxic in their liquid state, but cured lacquer and varnish finishes are perfectly safe.
For projects that come in contact with food, such as salad bowls and cutting boards, you really don’t want a hard shell finish (lacquer or varnish) that can chip or rub off. Mineral oil, teak oil, and butcher block oil are all popular and safe choices for these projects.
A popular finish for baby cribs is shellac, as the FDA approves this for use in the capsules of medications. This approval makes many woodworkers feel that shellac is more safe than other finishes. But cured lacquer is safe, as is any cured solvent- or water-borne finish.

Me again......... I use shellac, an all natural “hypoallergenic and non-toxic when cured” finish on my combs. I am personally very comfortable that since we will not be inhaling the sawdust particles nor coming into prolonged contact with the wood’s oils when playing a harmonica built with one of my combs, we’re pretty safe.

If you do a google search for “wood toxicity” you will find a number of different charts. There does not seem to be one definitive chart that lists every wood known to mankind. However, Rosewood is commonly listed as a wood that is an irritant to the eyes, skin and respiratory system.

Here is one such chart:
http://www.woodworkerssource.com/toxicity_list.php

On this very same chart, you will find that Cocobolo has a nearly identical description. Cocobolo is a beautiful wood that is commonly used to make harmonica combs. In fact, I just picked up some beautiful Cocobolo and will be experimenting with it very soon. One thing I have learned is that not all woods are ideal for cutting with a laser. Some are just too hard.

However, if you want to purchase a high quality comb right now, made from Cocobolo or Black Walnut or Mahogany (all listed on the wood toxicity chart above) you can get one here:
http://www.harpcase.com/id27.html

I’m sure they are perfectly safe and extremely well made.

Thanks for listening.
Tom Halchak

P.S. “Orange paduak smells like fish after it cuts. It take about a month for the smell to go away.”

I have had no such experience with paduak (pronounced pah-DOOK). In fact, quite to the contrary, I find that it has a very pleasant aroma when freshly cut. But in Matthew’s defense, there are many different species of paduak so we might not be talking about the same wood. I my quest to make the perfect comb, I have experimented with a number of woods. As mentioned above, some are less than ideal for cutting with a CNC laser. However, please rest assured - if something I try has a foul odor – it ain’t goin’ in one of my combs. That would be pretty stupid! I am personally very excited about paduak because it cuts nicely with the laser and it polishes up to a beautiful shine when finished.

P.P.S. Dymondwood has become very popular in the comb world. I recently secured a couple of samples to see how it cuts with the laser. It looks great, but personally I have some reservations about all the glue that holds the layers of wood together. I wonder if it might be toxic. :)
nacoran
4187 posts
Jun 08, 2011
11:05 AM
Tom, do you have a website? I try to keep a list in anyone out there who provides custom parts or other customization services. If you have a link I could add you.

----------
Nate
Facebook
Thread Organizer (A list of all sorts of useful threads)
florida-trader
2 posts
Jun 08, 2011
11:10 AM
I do not have a website yet. I've been too busy remodeling my house and making harmonica combs (and working my day job). But I definitely plan to get one up and running soon. Everything I have is listed on eBay and I do have an eBay Store set up. I also just subscribed to iContact in order to reach out to my customers more easily.

Thanks for asking.
nacoran
4188 posts
Jun 08, 2011
11:20 AM
Okay, well, if you get one up, let me know. It's not hard to find me around here.

----------
Nate
Facebook
Thread Organizer (A list of all sorts of useful threads)
captainbliss
555 posts
Jun 08, 2011
11:45 AM
@florida-trader:

I salute the grace and good humour of your first post here.

Welcome!

xxx
captainbliss
556 posts
Jun 08, 2011
11:52 AM
Since we're on the subject of "Wood Comb Warning," does anyone (player or manufacturer) give any thought to the fact that quite a few of the exotic hardwoods used for harmonica combs are on the "endangered" list?

See, for example http://www.musicwood.org/exotic.htm

xxx
nacoran
4190 posts
Jun 08, 2011
12:14 PM
I've got an idea for a poplar choice! It's got a neat grain, grows fast, dies young and leaves a a beautiful copse.

----------
Nate
Facebook
Thread Organizer (A list of all sorts of useful threads)
MEK
43 posts
Jun 08, 2011
2:12 PM
Thread backfire of the year. Florida-trader, do you do much shipping to Canada?

Oh and any plans for Suzuki combs?

Last Edited by on Jun 08, 2011 2:20 PM
Todd Parrott
511 posts
Jun 08, 2011
2:58 PM
I'm glad for this thread, as I didn't previously know about Tom Halchak's combs. Always nice to learn about a another source for combs! I'll have to check them out on Ebay...
Hawmonica
11 posts
Jun 08, 2011
4:33 PM
Thanks for the info Tom. We tried cutting/sealing/treating maple and cherry every which way and sometimes they would warp right off the machine, and sometimes after sitting for a couple of weeks (sealed). I have one harp with Cherry and it has not warped yet, but that is also because I assembled it immediately. We were sad to drop those woods, too many quality issues and risks. Hope you have better luck. They have nice tone.

You also mentioned that combs are made of coco bolo. I am not aware of anyone that makes combs out of this wood. We use Dymondwood that is colored to look like Coco Bolo. Real Coco Bolo in its self is regarded as the MOST POISONOUS wood in the world. I have had many discussions with the local Woodcraft store and they have warned me to stay away from Coco Bolo and Rosewood. I forgot to mention that they also advised against Orange Paduak because it is an exotic and can sometimes hold viruses. Even if it is sealed and Shellaced. I trust those guys more than the internet.

If you plan to make Coco Bolo combs, I seriously recommend that you incorporate as an S-Corp so if you get sued, they can't take your personal assets and your house. Free advice from my attorney.

In regards to the safety of Dymondwood, top cusomizers have been using it for 10 years. It just recently in the last year or two came out in the open market for sale. I have read the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) on it. As you said, just the sawdust is dangerous. It is perfectly safe to use as a comb material and I think it is superior to most woods. We have never had a complaint or health issue.

As far as price, after you pay 4.75 for shipping in the ebay auction, that is only $3 dollars less than one of our Dymondwood combs (9 colors) and $4 than our Bamboo, Mahogany, Yellow Heart, and only $2 less than our Bocote combs. All safe and superior quality.

We offer 12 comb models that fit 20 different harmonica models (Bushman, Hohner, Suzuki, Hering, Seydel etc). Rockin Ron also sells our combs on ebay and they are $4-$5 more, but include shipping.

It's a great thing that so many innovations and choices have come out for harps that are not crazy expensive. Just changing the comb in a harp, with just about anything solid/wood makes a difference.
shanester
381 posts
Jun 08, 2011
4:51 PM
This forum represents a huge community and potential market (at least harp nerd wise).

Probably best to not be slinging to much poo in your own pond!
----------
Shane

1shanester

Suffering may be optional, but it can be quite addictive!
Blowyourbrassoff
22 posts
Jun 08, 2011
5:39 PM
I'm not sure where Matt is getting his information but Cocobolo is NOT the most toxic wood in the world. LOL I'll gladly make a comb out of cocobolo and have done so for several years, no one has died yet. And logic would dictate that if rosewood was going to be so harmful companies like Suzuki would most definitely not make combs from it. As Tom stated, and most who work with wood know, the toxicity charts are based off of contact with the wood dust more than the wood itself. Even though some woods can be potentially irritating, it's more to do with contact to recently exposed surfaces while working with the wood, and like all allergic reactions it's not going to be the same from person to person. Those of us that make these products are more at risk than any customer ever will be. Another thing to keep in mind is that the surfaces of a comb that the player is going to come into contact with should already be well sealed on a quality comb. In my three years as a full time custom harp maker and comb maker I have never once ever heard of anyone having a single problem with any exotic wood comb that I have ever made, including cocobolo, rosewood, ebony, african blackwood, etc etc etc.

I'm not trying to start an argument or mud slinging, but I think if folks are going to give out warnings about other manufacturers products they should do a bit more research.

Chris
REM
75 posts
Jun 08, 2011
5:46 PM
Maybe you really did start this thread because you honestly felt you were helping people by warning them, but it really just comes off as you trying to bash a competitor that has lower prices than you.

I think this is an especially strange thing to do considering recently when Todd complimented the work of two other comb makers (and said nothing about your combs) you took personal offense to it, and somehow managed to interpret him praising another company as him putting down your products(which certainly wasn't true). And now here you are tearing down someone elses products under the guise of warning us.

Last Edited by on Jun 10, 2011 9:33 AM
nacoran
4192 posts
Jun 08, 2011
5:52 PM
Hawmonica, if you have friends who are giving you different advice about poisonous woods than what is on the internet you should tell them to put that information on the internet. On the internet information can be verified and fact checked and is ultimately more useful to people, but second hand information without context isn't very useful, as is unsolicited second hand legal advice. I think your shotgun approach to your competition is turning people off of, from what I've seen, a very good set of products you have.

If you Google coco bolo harmonica combs you'd find a thread from the Bushman forums talking about Bushman using coco bolo, although the thread is old enough so the links are broken.

Bushman

If you want to talk about pricing vs. a competitor, please keep it limited to the 'For Sale' page.

So, now, in the interest of unsolicited legal advice... be very careful about talking about things like poisonousness in a competitors product. Try to include links to some scientific studies backing things like that up. It's very easy to get worked up about something and go off half-cocked and, since you are dealing with someone's livelihood, you could end up on the wrong end of a libel suit if it turns out your facts are wrong.

Captainbliss, your comment kind of got buried in the mix, but sustainability wood harvesting would actually be a really an interesting topic to know more about. Back in college I worked as an editor on a student newspaper. Sometimes I wish I still had a staff of reporters I could send out to get the story! I know there has been some discussion about nickel allergies in harmonica cover plates and which brands, models and years might be a problem, but that no one seems to be able to get straight answers for a couple of the brands.

edit: It looks like a few more of you have weighed in while I was composing this! If some of what I said is redundant, don't see it as piling on, I just wrote it without reading the new posts.

----------
Nate
Facebook
Thread Organizer (A list of all sorts of useful threads)

Last Edited by on Jun 08, 2011 5:56 PM
florida-trader
3 posts
Jun 08, 2011
6:09 PM
MEK. Canada yes. Please send me an email through eBay.

Chris. Right on brother! I've owned one of your cocobolo GM combs for over a year and so far no ill effects. (cough cough)

As you now know, I have been marketing combs on eBay for about 7-8 months. I have been a member of MBH for a little longer than that (I'm a lurker). I have resisted the temptation to self-promote. I do not make any claims about my harp combs being better than...... or guaranteeing they will improve the quality of your tone........ or any other hyperbole.

People choose to purchase replacement combs for their own personal reasons. The odds are, anyone who is considering a custom or replacement comb already has a reason for doing so. They might believe that wood sounds better than plastic; or solid plastic sounds better than injection molded plastic; or they like the color of the custom comb; or they dropped their Golden Melody and the comb shattered so they need a new one. It doesn't matter. All I state is that the combs I make will fit the models they are designed to fit and that they are well made. If you aren't satisfied, you get your money back and we part friends. It's a pretty simple business plan. Make a quality product. Offer it at a reasonable price. Provide exceptional service. That's all I'm trying to do.

To those of you who have done business with me, I am genuinely honored. It is my pleasure to be of service. If you would like to join my mailing list and receive an OCCASIONAL update about what I am working on, send me a message through eBay.

Thanks,
Tom
KingBiscuit
50 posts
Jun 08, 2011
6:34 PM
@Hawmonica - Your opening statement of "I am not trying to disparage a competitor here," means you are trying your best to disparage a competitor. Drop it already...your smear campaign failed. Any further posts on this thread are just digging you in deeper.

@Florida-Trader - Nice polite response. Checked your combs out on e-bay. They look great! Had never heard of you before this thread. I have not seen anyone making wood combs for Lee Oskar...does anyone make them? If not, why?

Dan

Last Edited by on Jun 08, 2011 6:40 PM
Blowyourbrassoff
23 posts
Jun 08, 2011
7:03 PM
@KingBiscuit I make Lee Oskar combs from all of the materials available on my site. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

@Florida-Trader Hahaha Tom, I thought the name was familiar. Glad to see you're enjoying the comb, and I wish you well with your comb business, it can be a very rewarding venture. You'll get to meet some great people in the process.
Hawmonica
12 posts
Jun 08, 2011
7:46 PM
I'm sorry Tom, I should have come directly to you with my comments. Posting on here was the wrong way to go about it. My advice comes from experience and trial and error and these are the guys where I get my information from: www.woodcraft.com. If you read my posts, I think I gave you some good information, especially about incorporating. I also was not correct in some of my statements--pardon the error. I learned some things from you as well. As I said at the beginning of this post your combs look great. Your offering materials that we do not and I think that is a good thing as long as they are safe. If I want a brass comb I know to go to Chris' site. If I want a cherry I go to you. If I offended you in any way I would like to make amends and apologize most sincerely. I wish you luck in your endeavors.

As far as a "smear" campaign, I said nothing negative about his combs. I did not attack him directly. READ THE POSTS. This was simply a discussion of raw materials and comparison of products and safety. As every member of a forum, I have a right to express opinions and information that I have learned without getting "beat" on.

I have made my amends with Tom publicly, now please leave me alone. I think we can conclude this post with the simple statement that my way of going about it was "dickish" and I have apologized directly to Tom for that. All in all, some good information was shared and I learned some things as well as Im sure you did too.
florida-trader
4 posts
Jun 08, 2011
8:25 PM
Matt:
Thank you for your apology. I have very thick skin. I did not take your comments personally so I am not offended. I look at it as a lively exchange and an opportunity to put some good information out there. You make good combs. I make good combs. There is plenty of space out there for both of us. It is a very small world and I suspect one day our paths will cross in person. Perhaps when that day comes, we can share a good laugh. It was definitely an interesting day on the Dirty-South Blues Harp Forum.
Tom
Big Al
6 posts
Jun 08, 2011
8:40 PM
I have had the opportunity to purchase many of Matt's combs and all I can say is that they are knockout great combs.
Another thing that I want to share about Matt... (after knowing him for over 10 years...) he is an absolute perfectionist when it comes to whatever he is doing. And in the case of making combs or customizing harps... he is the same way.
HarveyHarp
264 posts
Jun 09, 2011
6:46 AM
I have bought and used combs from Tom, Mathew, and Chris, and made my own, and hands down, my combs are the worst. The rest of them are all great, and all of the above makers really care about their customers, which is why I don't make any more combs.
----------
Photobucket

HarveyHarp
jim
849 posts
Jun 09, 2011
8:10 AM
cocobolo wood makes awesome combs...

Here's a MB made by Slava Vinogradov

Regarding health issues...

Rosewood has a distinctive smell that some people are allergic to. (smells pleasant by the way)

I would be more concerned with inhaling the fumes of the so-called "dymondwood" composites. Those have a strong acrylic smell, at least those combs that I have seen.

----------

Free Harp Learning Center
HarpNinja
1472 posts
Jun 09, 2011
8:40 AM
With the dymonwood, I am a fan of the laser cutting, buffing, and shellacing. The Sjoeberg combs don't have a smell or taste. FWIW, I have a stock in transit. Should have some GM and MBD/Crossover combs to sell individually in the next week or so (customs always varies).
----------
Mike
Quicksilver Custom Harmonicas
jim
850 posts
Jun 09, 2011
8:46 AM
I don't know... I've seen 3 composite combs so far that were home-made (not telling you who made them not to raise any "religious" disputes).

Dick Sjoeberg is a great craftsman. I'm sure his combs should be great as well.

FWIW, I am Dick Sjoeberg's endorser now. You can get his new UST embossing tools through me. I should have them in stock by the end of the month. I think I'll get some combs as well.

----------

Free Harp Learning Center
groyster1
1099 posts
Jun 09, 2011
10:53 AM
I tried a walnut dymondwood comb on a sp20 it was very easy to install and is a gorgeous comb but did nothing for the sound from now on my sp20s keep their stock combs
Sausagescoffer
44 posts
Jun 09, 2011
1:52 PM
Tom - I live in the UK and have bought wood (cherry) and your acrylic combs - ALL BRILLIANT - and competetively priced - you even refunded me some money when you found a cheaper overseas shipping option - now that's what I call service mate!!

Well done and keep up the great work!
bigd
316 posts
Jun 09, 2011
4:14 PM
I've e-conversed with Tom H and find him affable and generous in his responsiveness. I also have had one of Matt's cases for years and unbeknownst to him everybody from Quincy Jones to Maya Angelou has commented on it: Well- to all the colorful harps by Harvey and Brad and Hohner that showcase well in it! Each week Valerie Simpson (Ashford & Simpson own the Sugar Bar where I play for them) intros "Dennis and his box of harps". I can't tell you how many times the curious have asked can I take a photo of your case of "wow they're cool looking" instruments. A lot of you guys have served me well! d
----------
myspace facebook
Todd Parrott
513 posts
Jun 09, 2011
10:00 PM
@jim - If I were making combs, I would be concerned with inhaling anything - dust, fumes, etc., regardless of the material. That's where the real danger lies, especially with exotic woods. But once the comb is finished there is no danger of being poisoned.

My dymondwood combs from Chris Reynolds don't really have a taste or smell, though I have seen other dymondwood combs that do have a taste to them, but it doesn't bother me.

Slava and Dick Sjoeberg make some nice looking combs. Congratulations on being an endorser.

I really like the fantasy marble combs by Chris too - very cool looking.

Last Edited by on Jun 09, 2011 10:00 PM
jim
852 posts
Jun 10, 2011
7:39 AM
@Todd:

About the smell of composite combs (or its absence) - do you think it depends on the type of resin used?

Dick Sjoeberg and Slava Vinogradov are real professionals and great people to deal with. I'm acting like a bridge with their combs - Dick's combs are not available in Russia, and I can get them for Russian customers, and Slava's combs are very hard to buy from outside Russia - and I have those as well.



----------

Free Harp Learning Center
HarpNinja
1474 posts
Jun 10, 2011
7:50 AM
I think the smell depends mostly on the finishing/buffing.
----------
Mike
Quicksilver Custom Harmonicas
Andrew
1335 posts
Jun 10, 2011
9:25 AM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1991773/

Andrew.
-----------------------------------------
Those who are tardy do not get fruit cup.
walterharp
606 posts
Jun 10, 2011
1:39 PM
As far as sustainability, almost all tropical hardwoods are not harvested sustainably.

Bamboo is a good option, and temperate hardwoods are mostly managed sustainably

just in case anybody cares.
As far as maple, the one i got from spiers has not warped at all after a year
Todd Parrott
514 posts
Jun 10, 2011
9:31 PM
@jim - Good question... I'm not 100% certain, but I would probably have to agree with Mike.

Also, I've heard more than one comb maker say that making dymondwood combs stinks up the house/shop.

Another interesting thing is that the B-Radical combs, which are dymondwood, don't appear to be finished or buffed, but do have a certain smell or taste at first, though it isn't very strong and goes away after awhile. At least this has been my experience.
florida-trader
5 posts
Jun 11, 2011
6:21 AM
Bad news. Cocobolo does not cut well on the laser so I guess if you want a solid wood cocobolo comb you're going to have to get it from Chris Reynolds. :(
jim
853 posts
Jun 11, 2011
8:29 AM
..or Slava Vinogradov.

----------

Free Harp Learning Center
logansays
14 posts
Jun 11, 2011
10:07 AM
Slava Vinogradovs combs are really beautifull and well made..Excellent workmanship!!
florida-trader
1540 posts
Jun 10, 2021
10:41 AM
It is just more than 10 years since this thread was originally posted. I am reviving it for old time sakes and have created an additional post to talk about how this conversation has affected my business.
----------
Tom Halchak
Blue Moon Harmonicas
Blue Moon Harmonicas


Post a Message



(8192 Characters Left)


Modern Blues Harmonica supports

§The Jazz Foundation of America

and

§The Innocence Project

 

 

 

 

ADAM GUSSOW is an official endorser for HOHNER HARMONICAS